Members Project 39

The Lake District (Acrylic)

Step 1

This is a 12″x16″ little canvas of one of the many picturesque bridges in the The English Lake District. I did my sky before doing the drawing. The sky was coblat blue, mixed with titanium white from the top all the way down using my 1.5″ flat washbrush.
 

Wash the brush out well and then get a good thick chunk of titanium white and a couple of daubs here and there for the white clouds/. I then put a tiny touch of paynes grey into the original blue and white mix and put this underneath some of the white cloud, then with a finger just merge the colours together, smoothing the white upward to the top edges of the clouds.

Once this was dried I then put a very simple outline drawing on.

Step 2

I changed to my 3/4″ flat brush and with raw umber fill in the distant mountain and then whilst it was all still good and wet a couple of strokes of burnt sienna and then some paynes grey to the bottom of the mountain. Finally I washed the brush out well and dropped some naples yellow to the top to capture a little bit of light. Make your brush strokes count when doing something like this, what I mean is bring the brush strokes downwards in the way that you want the mountain to flow.
Step 3

Next for these trees I changed to my No 8 round brush the mixture was hookers green and raw sienna and stipple on with the point of the brush to give a tree like rough shape. Do the same with a little bit of paynes grey and cobalt blue mixed to the base of the trees. Again with the same stippling techniques pop a little bit of naples yellow to the tops here and there to capture a little bit of light.
Step 4
 
For the big mountain still using my  3/4″ flat brush I started off with raw umber then for the darker areas a touch of paynes grey into the raw umber, again being aware all the time of the shape of the mountain and all the brush strokes are going in the direction that I want to shape it with.

A little bit of paynes grey nice and dark here and there to give the effect of some crevices and shadow in the mountain, and yet again capture the light with naples yellow.

Be aware that all of this needs to be stronger than the first mountain.

Step 5
 
All of these trees were done in exactly the same way as the first lot, the only difference is to bring these slightly further forward I added a touch of burnt sienna into the mix.
Step 6

Time for the first wash on the bridge, and I used my No 8 round brush to do this and a mixture of paynes grey with titanium white. There was plenty of water into the mix so it flows and its not too powerful.
Step 7

The detail of the bridge is done with the tip of my No 8 round brush and it was a few random strokes here and there firstly of raw umber, then of paynes grey, then a few touches of burnt sienna.

Notice I have left a little bit of light on the top of the bridge which we will fill in later, but basically you are just giving the effect of stone work.

The arch of the bridge is painted in just paynes grey nice and dark.
 

Step 8
 

It doesn’t seem like I have done much here but the bridge now has more warmth to it, that because once it had dried I used my 3/4″ flat brush and with a very weak and watery burnt sienna, stroked over and glazed the whole thing.

Then with the sharp edge of my flat brush placed a little naples yellow on the top edge of the bridge.

Also at this stage I filled in the land looking through the bridge, I used my No 8 round brush, this was just raw sienna and whilst it was still wet and still with my round brush, stipple on a few blobs of hookers green and raw sienna mixed.

Step 9

Before I did the very big trees I filled in the bushes behind then, using my No  k8 round brush again and in the same way we did the last big clump of trees, but the main green was hookers green and raw sienna mixed.

I then changed to my No 3 rigger brush and painted the boughs and trunks of the trees a good strong dark mix. Here and there dropped in a little bit of naples yellow to the left hand side of some of the trunks.

I then changed back to my 3/4″ flat brush and with a nice strong mix of hookers green and burnt sienna using the side of the brush, I just tapped on with the side to create the foliage. Then a little bit of paynes grey under the clumps of foliage and then capture the light with some naples yellow to the tops of the foliage.

Step 10
 
Now to start he water and the reflections first.

I used my 3/4″ flat for all of these. In the far distance just drag down some raw sienna, very simple strokes just dragging downwards. Then with the sharp edge of the brush, just some paynes grey to reflect the arch. I used the same colour to reflect the tree trunks to the left. Then a little bit of raw umber to reflect the bridge itself.

Now importantly let all of this dry, totally.
 

Step 11
 

Once totally dry again now still using my f3/3″ flat brush and with a mixture of coblat blue, coblat blue, a tiny touch of hookers green a tiny touch of paynes grey with plenty of water, being extra careful not to get this mix too green, simply stroke though everything using horizontal strokes to keep everything flat. Then after washing out my brush a few strokes of titanium where here and the in the water.
Step 12

Now for the bank on the other side. I’m still using my 3/4″ flat brush and I started off by doing the muddy bits first, raw umber and just stroke downwards to create the bank. The grasses on top of this were painted with hookers green and burnt sienna but with a lot of raw sienna into it.

Then finally where the grass meets the mud add a little bit of paynes grey just to make the grass sit down on top of the bank.

Step 13

I firstly painted the muddy area going up to the river using raw sienna using my flat 3/4″ flat brush. Then daub on a few touches of paynes grey here and there for a bit of texture the some naples yellow just to highlight a few areas.

The grass here is quite a big section was painted with hookers green and raw sienna but here and there in the foreground I flicked upwards to create some grasses. In the rocky bits, whilst doing the grass I simply put some strong raw umber big daubs in the middle of all the grasses, then with a credit card just scrape the shape of the rocks, leaving a gap between each scrape so that the darker paint gives shadow. Then finally a few touches of naples yellow here and there. There we go job done. Quite a strong little painting this one. I hope you enjoy giving it a go.